Listening and Believing

Essay 1
Listening and Believing
As a class, we have read and discussed Audre Lorde’s The Master’s Tools Will Never Dismantle the Master’s House Jane Gallop’s The Ethics of Reading, and Peggy McIntosh’s White Privilege and Male Privilege. Additionally, we have learned about the Believing Game (Peter Elbow).

Listening to others is one of the most powerful tools for justice that we have at our disposal. For this assignment, you will be practicing the Believing Game by interviewing yourself or a person of your choosing about a time that you/they felt unheard. What were you or your interview subject trying to communicate? What was the breakdown? What happened that made you or your subject feel like you weren’t being listened to? How did it make you feel? How have you behaved differently since? What, if anything, has changed for you now that you’ve encountered the texts listed above and begun working on this project?

In your essay’s conclusion, you should sum up your essay’s main argument in one or two sentences, but you should also reflect on what you got out of doing this assignment. Review the learning outcomes on this assignment sheet as well as the Core Values at rowanfyw.org and think about how you can connect some parts of this project to your other classes, your personal life, or your future career.

Required Sources
Gallop, J. (2000, Fall). The ethics of reading: Close encounters. Journal of Curriculum 
Theorizing, 16(3), 7-17.
Lorde, A. (1984). The master’s tools will never dismantle the master’s house. Sister outsider: 
Essays and speeches. Berkeley, CA: Crossing Press, 110-114.
McIntosh, P. (1989, July/August). Unpacking the invisible knapsack. Peace and Freedom 
Magazine, 10-12.

Optional Source
TEDx Talks. (2010, June 19). TEDxBerkeley – Dacher Keltner – 04/03/10 [Video file]. Retrieved 
from https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KsFxWSuu_4I 

Learning Outcomes
This assignment will help you:

Use reading and composing processes as a way to think, discover, and explore ideas (CV1)

Identify where to go, what to ask, and what to do at various stages in the writing process for feedback and support (CV1)

Read texts closely to interpret and understand writers’ messages, and read texts critically to evaluate, critique, and question those messages and how they are constructed (CV2)

Ensure that your own writing is both meaningful and responsive to authentic rhetorical purposes (CV3)

Appropriately select and effectively incorporate information and ideas from texts into your writing toward a specific purpose. (CV4)

Meet academic audiences’ expectations for documentation of sources with signal phrases, in-text citations, and a References page (CV4)

Acknowledge and show respect for different views/opinions of others in your writing (CV5)

Recognize that word and language choices have power and consequences (CV5)

Create boundaries between your voice and the voices of others and appropriately use paraphrases, quotations, and citations in accordance with the expectations of academic integrity (CV5)

Guidelines

Heading in the upper, left-hand corner of the first page with your name, the course, my name, the assignment, and the date

Original title centered on the first page

Double Spaced, 12 pt. Times New Roman font, 1” margins all around

3-5 pages in length

Signal phrases and quote sandwiches to attribute quotations and/or ideas of others

References page in APA format with an alphabetical listing of all sources used in the essay

Due  Dates

Monday, Sept. 27th by 11:59 pm- Interview Questions and Proposal due (started in class Thursday, Sept. 23rd)
Monday, Sept. 27th by 11:59 pm- Critical Engagement (Dialogue script) due
Wednesday, Sept. 29th  by 11:59 pm- Complete Interview responses due
Monday, Oct. 4th by 11:59 pm Intro and first body paragraph of essay due
Thursday, Oct. 7th  by the start of class– Complete Rough Draft of essay due for Peer Review
Sunday, Oct. 10th by 11:59 pm- Revised Essay due for Instructor feedback

Possible structures/organization:
Outline A
Introduction — Appropriately focused hook; funnel of context for your argument (introduce and very briefly summarize your main sources, including interview testimony or personal anecdote); motivating question(s) and/or preliminary assumptions; working thesis.
First body paragraph — Expanded summaries of the 3 assigned sources you’ll be referring to throughout the essay (Gallop, McIntosh, Lorde) and connections between the sources and your thesis and/or motivating question(s); if you quote from any of the sources in this paragraph, keep it brief.
Second body paragraph — Partial expanded summary of your interview testimony or personal anecdote; additional relevant summary of an assigned source; analysis/commentary based on the assigned source; 2-3 (total) purposefully selected quotes from testimony/anecdote and source.
Third body paragraph — Conclusion to expanded summary of interview testimony or personal anecdote; additional relevant summary of second assigned source; analysis/commentary based on second assigned source; 2-3 (total) purposefully selected quotes from testimony/anecdote and second assigned source.
Fourth body paragraph — Additional details from interview testimony or personal anecdote; additional relevant summary of third (and fourth if using all) assigned source(s); analysis/commentary based on third (and fourth?) assigned source(s); 2-4 (total) purposefully selected quotes from testimony/anecdote and third (and fourth?) assigned source(s).
Fifth body paragraph  — Synthesis among all assigned sources used, generating further insight into interview testimony or personal anecdote; 2-3 purposefully selected quotes from testimony/anecdote and assigned sources.
Conclusion — Further brief synthesis among all assigned sources; brief summary of your essay’s main argument; reflection on what you got out of doing this assignment (what has changed for you? consider the assignment’s learning outcomes; the FYWP Core Values; and connections to your other classes, your personal life, or your future career).
 
 
​Outline B
Introduction — Appropriately focused hook; funnel of context for your argument (introduce and very briefly summarize your main sources, including interview testimony or personal anecdote); motivating question(s) and/or preliminary assumptions; working thesis.
First body paragraph — Thorough summary of interview testimony or personal anecdote; 1-3 purposefully selected quotes from testimony/anecdote.
Second body paragraph — Expanded relevant summaries of 2 assigned sources; synthesis between these 2 assigned sources; analysis of interview testimony or personal anecdote; 2-3 (total) purposefully selected quotes from testimony/anecdote and assigned sources.
Third body paragraph — Expanded relevant summary of third assigned source; analysis of interview testimony or personal anecdote; 2-3 (total) purposefully selected quotes from testimony/anecdote and third assigned source.
Fourth body paragraph  — Synthesis among all assigned sources used, generating further insight into interview testimony or personal anecdote; 2-3 purposefully selected quotes from testimony/anecdote and assigned sources.
Conclusion — Further brief synthesis among all assigned sources; brief summary of your essay’s main argument; reflection on what you got out of doing this assignment (what has changed for you? consider the assignment’s learning outcomes; the FYWP Core Values; and connections to your other classes, your personal life, or your future career).

Assignment Components (with labor time estimates):

❑ Read and annotate each of the assigned sources (30-60 minutes each)
❑ Summarize each source (20-30 minutes each)
❑ Compose contextual introductions for each source (15-20 minutes each)
❑ Compose synthesis (dialogue script, video; 45-60 minutes)
❑ Compose “your take” (30-45 minutes each)

❑ Compose list of Interview Questions (30-60 minutes)
❑ Interview Proposal including who you will interview (Must be approved by instructor; 30-60 minutes)
❑ Answers to interview questions (30-60 minutes)

❑ Stitch together components of critical engagement and interview results (45-60 minutes)
❑ Draft introduction, thesis, topic sentences, transitions, conclusion (60-90 minutes)
❑ Fill out and format References page (20-30 minutes)
❑ Read draft out loud, marking areas to revisit (5-10 minutes)
❑ Brainstorm and make changes (15-30 minutes)
❑ Peer review (20+ minutes for each classmate’s draft)

❑ Review peer review feedback, prioritize suggestions (15-20 minutes)
❑ Read draft out loud, marking areas to revisit (10-15 minutes)
❑ Apply ARMS revision strategy (Add, Remove, Move, Substitute; 30-60 minutes)
❑ Make final adjustments to the essay (10-20 minutes)
❑ Doublecheck and clean up format of References page, in-text citations, first-page header, page numbers (20-30 minutes)