Suppose you read an article reporting a negative correlation between religiosity and depression…

Suppose you read an article reporting a negative
correlation between religiosity and depression (i.e., the less religious, the
more depressed). What factors could account for this relationship?

1. Remember that a correlation or coappearance is not, in
itself, proof of causation.

2. Keep in mind that correlations enable us to make
predictions from one event to another; they do not, however, provide
explanations as to why the events are related.

3. When a correlation is observed, consider all possible
pathways and directions of causation. For example, if Event A and Event B are
correlated,

Suppose you read an article reporting a negative
correlation between religiosity and depression (i.e., the less religious, the
more depressed). What factors could account for this relationship?

1. Remember that a correlation or coappearance is not, in
itself, proof of causation.

2. Keep in mind that correlations enable us to make
predictions from one event to another; they do not, however, provide
explanations as to why the events are related.

3. When a correlation is observed, consider all possible
pathways and directions of causation. For example, if Event A and Event B are
correlated, does A cause B? Does B cause A? Do A and B cause each other? Does C
cause A and B?